The Dogtag Chronicles

last-snowfall:

el-fridlo:

Sergeant Stubby, so named for his lack of a tail, was a stray pitbull found wandering Yale campus by some soldiers there during drill.

"He learned the bugle calls, the drills, and even a modified dog salute as he put his right paw on his right eyebrow when a salute was executed by his fellow soldiers."

He was smuggled into WW1 by a soldier, and allowed to stay when he saluted the man who would later become his commanding officer.

He was sent to the trenches where he was under constant enemy fire for over a month. He was wounded in the leg by a German hand grenade, sent to a hospital to convalesce, then returned to the front lines…

After being wounded in a gas attack, Stubby developed such a sensitivity that he would run and bark and alert the other soldiers of incoming gas attacks AND artillery attacks precious seconds before they occurred, saving countless lives. A canine early warming system.

He would go into no man’s land, find wounded men, shouting in English, And stay with them, barking, until medics arrived.

He once captured a German spy.
The spy, mapping out Allied trenches, tried to call to Stubby, but Stubby got aggressive and then chased down and attacked the spy when he attempted to flee, allowing Allied soldiers to capture him.

For this he was awarded the rank of Sergeant- the first dog to do so.

After helping the Allies retake Château-Thierry in France, Sergeant Stubby was sewn a uniform by the women of the town, on which to wear his many medals.

He went on to meet multiple Presidents, dignitaries and ambassadors and become the mascot of Georgetown University football.

There is nothing about this that is not magical.

militaryarmament:

U.S Army Rangers with the Afghan-international security force pulling security on a compound in Kandahar province. Zhari District, Afghanistan. June 26, 2010.

I’m good but I’m not sniper from a helicopter good. But then again so few people are.

I’m good but I’m not sniper from a helicopter good.

But then again so few people are.

1234marinescorps:

fuckyeahfemalemarines:

Camp Foster, Okinawa, Japan: Women Marines march during a parade around the time of the Korean War. The number of women on active duty during the Korean War reached peak strength at 2,787.

marching in heels. that is skill


That is a whole lot of whoop ass walking at you. I went to catholic school and was taught by nuns. I am not afraid of females but I know when a woman is not to be trifled with.

1234marinescorps:

fuckyeahfemalemarines:

Camp Foster, Okinawa, Japan: Women Marines march during a parade around the time of the Korean War. The number of women on active duty during the Korean War reached peak strength at 2,787.

marching in heels. that is skill

That is a whole lot of whoop ass walking at you. I went to catholic school and was taught by nuns. I am not afraid of females but I know when a woman is not to be trifled with.

freetheshit-outofyou:

SHHHH quite M1A1


Quiet

freetheshit-outofyou:

SHHHH quite M1A1

Quiet

spookingofskelesackia:

djapavlak:

historynet:

A paratrooper’s loadout before a combat jump early in the Vietnam War (1960s 1000x8000)

American or Vietnamese? I can’t imagine Americans jumping with a .30-06 M1 after they’d adopted the M14 and maybe M16

Well, it looks to me like everything else there says “US” on it, so I guess this guy was just a stickler for the old’uns

The M1 was still in use during the Vietnam War. Before there were soldiers there were “advisers” and they were there before the M16 war introduced. Our could have been a special forces rig. They did a lot of jumps in Vietnam.

spookingofskelesackia:

djapavlak:

historynet:

A paratrooper’s loadout before a combat jump early in the Vietnam War (1960s 1000x8000)

American or Vietnamese? I can’t imagine Americans jumping with a .30-06 M1 after they’d adopted the M14 and maybe M16

Well, it looks to me like everything else there says “US” on it, so I guess this guy was just a stickler for the old’uns

The M1 was still in use during the Vietnam War. Before there were soldiers there were “advisers” and they were there before the M16 war introduced. Our could have been a special forces rig. They did a lot of jumps in Vietnam.

lifehackable:

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http://theaudiobookbay.com/
More Here

weaponslover:

Take your kids shooting. Who knows? You may have a future champion. She is way better than most of us at handling target shooting.

Better trigger discipline than many on here.

paxmachina:

Using a pencil, not a lens, to capture images of the war in Afghanistan

Photo:PFC Justin Blue of the 3rd Platoon, Apache Troop, 1st Squadron, 75th Calvary Regiment, from the 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault). He is taking a break while on patrol near the village of Qalandrakhel  a few miles outside of Bagram Airfield during an operation to suppress rockets that were being fired onto the base.

It’s never easy to capture the images of a war, even if you’re carrying the best camera money can buy. But what if your only tools to document conflict are a pencil and paper?

That’s the task that Richard Johnson takes on. The experienced graphic artist has traveled several times to Afghanistan and Iraq, where he hand-sketched images of the wars. His latest series for the Washington Post is titled “Drawing up the Drawdown.

Johnson returned to Maryland this week from his latest trip to Afghanistan, and he readily acknowledges the difficulties of his work.

“I have no clue what I’m doing,” he admits. “There is no doubt that when I’m out there — as well-intentioned as I may be — when we’re on patrol, my life is in the hands of those guys. And to a degree you can certainly understand why it takes me a while to gain [the soldiers’] trust, because I am a risk to them.”

He pushed himself to sketch nonstop during this latest trip. “Basically, I didn’t stop drawing for the six weeks I was there,” he says. That included sketching at times when he previously would have stopped.

“Places where I think I would’ve tucked my sketchpad out of the way — like flying with the doors open on a Blackhawk helicopter — I’ve kept my sketchpad in my hand and continued drawing through a lot of those scenarios,” he says.

That resulted in more candid images of the soldiers — and more honest encounters.

“For me, it’s all about these accidental interactions,” he says. “If I can help it, it’s never staged. It’s always completely natural. Either I start drawing, and they ask me what the hell I’m doing, or I talk to them and ask them if I can draw them. Or, at times, I’ll just draw them anyways, and once they’re drawn, I’ll offer them up a sketch depending on what they’re doing.”

While he says his craft isn’t any better or worse than that of a photographer, he does admit that there are intrinsic differences between the two art forms — both in practice and effect.

“The image you’re seeing when you process something I’ve sketched is a much more human image than the camera ever gives you,” he explains. “For people looking at it, there’s a feeling of much more contact there.” He thinks that can be useful for many of the stories that seem to be overloading audiences this year.

It’s great for telling stories where you need people to care about people who are far, far away,” he argue. “So your refugee camps in Syria; internally displaced camps inside Iraq; Ebola in Africa — these are stories I think that it could be used incredibly effectively.”

And not lugging a camera around has an advantage any soldier would appreciate: It lets him skirt just the right side of the rules. “It kind of defies the military restriction on photography,” he explains. “There are places where the pencil has taken me that I don’t think they would allow cameras, at times.”

Johnson admits that documentary sketch art is a limited field — he says there’s only five or six people in the field altogether. Simply proving to publications that his work is valuable is a struggle in itself. But he stands by the idea that sketches can provide something that a photograph can’t.

“I have to work very hard to draw what I see, not what I feel about a person,” he argue. “I think through doing that, I can provide a window for empathy for the viewer, where … they get pulled into something they wouldn’t necessarily read otherwise. It’s a device for making people care.”

oparnoshoshoi:

thedogtagchronicles:

unrepentantwarriorpriest:

pastor-decanus:

haywoodjublomee:

going-cyclic:

poser.

PX hero WOW

Anyone participating in Stolen Valor (the impersonation of a Veteran or Active Duty personel for personal gain) is disgracing all those who have served and sacraficed for this great nation. ~ Pastor Decanus James

Drag him into the street and beat him.

He has all the medals. He was also wearing desert boots with this outfit. Good stuff.

I spy, with my little eye, a presidential unit citation on the wrong side.
Dude took “army of one” to a whole new level, he’s his own unit.

Anyone that has spent a couple days in the military will recognize the stuff behind him as a hallway in a military unit. I heard it was a battalion HQ of one of the basic training units at Benning but I can’t remember which one.

oparnoshoshoi:

thedogtagchronicles:

unrepentantwarriorpriest:

pastor-decanus:

haywoodjublomee:

going-cyclic:

poser.

PX hero WOW

Anyone participating in Stolen Valor (the impersonation of a Veteran or Active Duty personel for personal gain) is disgracing all those who have served and sacraficed for this great nation.
~ Pastor Decanus James

Drag him into the street and beat him.

He has all the medals. He was also wearing desert boots with this outfit. Good stuff.

I spy, with my little eye, a presidential unit citation on the wrong side.

Dude took “army of one” to a whole new level, he’s his own unit.

Anyone that has spent a couple days in the military will recognize the stuff behind him as a hallway in a military unit. I heard it was a battalion HQ of one of the basic training units at Benning but I can’t remember which one.

unrepentantwarriorpriest:

pastor-decanus:

haywoodjublomee:

going-cyclic:

poser.

PX hero WOW

Anyone participating in Stolen Valor (the impersonation of a Veteran or Active Duty personel for personal gain) is disgracing all those who have served and sacraficed for this great nation. ~ Pastor Decanus James

Drag him into the street and beat him.

He has all the medals. He was also wearing desert boots with this outfit. Good stuff.

unrepentantwarriorpriest:

pastor-decanus:

haywoodjublomee:

going-cyclic:

poser.

PX hero WOW

Anyone participating in Stolen Valor (the impersonation of a Veteran or Active Duty personel for personal gain) is disgracing all those who have served and sacraficed for this great nation.
~ Pastor Decanus James

Drag him into the street and beat him.

He has all the medals. He was also wearing desert boots with this outfit. Good stuff.

thedogtagchronicles:

Damn straight

thedogtagchronicles:

Damn straight

saving-livesprn:

skelee-enfeel:

kchikurdi:

m4zlum:

ISIS uses chemical weapons against the Kurds in Kobanê

graphic content

The real question is how this was acquired. I’m leaning towards it being either stolen from the Syrian government, bought off the black market, or supplied by a friendly foreign interest.

This just goes to show how far the Islamic State is willing to go in order to achieve it’s goals.

Lemme go over and fuck them up as one last Hooyah before I get out

Where did the group that controls a lot of Iraqi real estate and former military bases get chemical weapons?
http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/10/14/world/middleeast/us-casualties-of-iraq-chemical-weapons.html?smid=fb-share&_r=0

Where oh where could anyone find chemical weapons in Iraq?
Using chemical weapons on Kurds is just repeating history.